EMC: Serial number translationΒΆ

Title:EMC: Serial number translation
Author:Douglas O’Leary <dkoleary@olearycomputers.com>
Description:How to read EMC serial numbers
Date created:06/2001
Date updated:07/2005
Disclaimer:Standard: Use the information that follows at your own risk. If you screw up a system, don’t blame it on me...

When running inq or syminq, you’ll see a column titled Ser Num. This column has quite a bit of information hiding in it.

An example syminq output is below. Your output will differ slightly as I’m creating a table from a book to show this; I don’t currently have access to a system where I can get the actual output just yet.

Device   Product Device
Name Type Vendor ID Rev Ser_Num Cap(KB)
/dev/dsk/c1t0d0 EMC SYMMETRIX 5265 73009150 459840  
/dev/dsk/c1t4d0 BCV EMC SYMMETRIX 5265 73010150 459840
/dev/dsk/c1t5d0 GK EMC SYMMETRIX 5265 73019150 2880
/dev/dsk/c2t6d0 GK EMC SYMMETRIX 5265 7301A281 2880

Using the first and last serial numbers as examples, the serial number is broken out as follows:

73 Last two digits of the Symmetrix serial number
009 Symmetrix device number
15 Symmetrix director number. If <= 16, using the A processor
0 Port number on the director
73 Last two digits of the Symmetrix serial number
01A Symmetrix device number
28 Symmetrix director number. If > 16, using the B proccessor on board: (${brd}-16).
0 Port number on the director

So, the first example, device 009 is mapped to director 15, processor A, port 0 while the second example has device 01A mapped to director 12, processor B, port 0.

../../_images/emc_serial.jpg

Even if you don’t buy any of the EMC software, you can get the inq command from their web site. Understanding the serial numbers will help you get a better understanding of which ports are going to which hosts. Understanding this and documenting it will circumvent hours of rapturous cable tracings.